New PDF release: Building physics : heat, air and moister : fundamentals and

By Hugo Hens

ISBN-10: 3433602344

ISBN-13: 9783433602348

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Control volumes with known temperature act as known terms and are transferred to the right. In such a manner, each building detail is converted into a system of equations having the form [Ps]p,p []p = [Ps,i,j,k i,j,k]p with [Ps]p,p the p rows, p columns the conductance matrix, []p the p unknown temperatures the column matrix and [Ps,i,j,k i,j,k]p the p known temperatures column matrix. The accuracy of a CVM-calculation depends on mesh width. The smaller these widths, the closer the numeric solution approaches the exact one.

21). 21. Dirac impulse. Response factors Fourier’s second law can be solved for a Dirac impulse. Suppose temperature s1 at the bounding surface s1 undergoes a pulse. As a result, a variation qs1(t ) of the heat flow rate at that surface and a variation s2(t) of the temperature and qs2(t ) of the heat flow rate at the other bounding surface s2 will ensue. When all material properties are constants, the functions qs1(t ), s2(t ) and qs2(t) define the response factors of the heat flow rate qs1, the temperature s2 and the heat flow rate qs2 for a temperature impulse s1 at bounding surface s1.

Thermal conductivity of the three materials is 1, 2 and 3. e. a linear equation with seven unknowns. In two dimensions, the result is a linear equation with five unknowns: 3 l 1, m   1  2    1  2  3  l , m l 1, m 2 0   2  3  l , m 1 2   1  3  l , m 1 2 A solution for all other cases is found the same way. In three dimensions, a control volume may include a maximum of eight materials. In two dimensions, that maximum is four. Per control volume, we obtain a linear equation with seven (three dimensions) or five unknowns (two dimensions).

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Building physics : heat, air and moister : fundamentals and engineering methods with examples and exercises by Hugo Hens


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